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Seniors Look to Debates to Sway Their Votes

senior politicsIn the midst of this election year, commercial breaks are filled with campaign ads and mailboxes are flooded with mailers seeking support. While it may seem that seniors are a decided vote, reports suggest that many seniors are looking to the upcoming series of presidential debates between Governor Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama to help make up their minds when it comes to whose name they will place a check next to this November.

A 2009 report by the Democracy Corps illustrates that senior votes can be somewhat volatile. In the 1980’s republican candidates essentially swept the senior presidential vote. However, with President Clinton’s election in 1992, the senior vote swayed with 50% of individuals 65 and over voting for the Democratic nominee. (http://www.govhealthit.com/blog/first-debate-healthcare-and-senior-vote)

In today’s senior vote, experts expect that seniors will look to opinions expressed by the candidates in forums like the debates to hear each side’s take on elder care views. Seniors want to hear what Romney proposes in terms of health care, or be sold on the better benefits offered by ObamaCare and the Affordble Care Act.

Whether seniors are still active, working individuals, or perhaps living independently at an advanced age with the assistance of caregivers and the technology of a home care system or home care software, all elderly Americans are concerned about issues like Social Security – a major source of income for many seniors – and health coverage via Medicare. While seniors likely have other issues that they feel strongly about, there’s no doubt that major changes in these arenas could have subsequent major impacts on the lives of American seniors.

Helping Seniors Keep on Top of Politics
Seniors living at home can help keep abreast of the latest political news with the help of a caregiver armed with the power of ClearCare’s homecare software and homecare system. One way includes tasks being created within the homecare software for caregivers to help seniors remind when debates are being televised so that interested seniors can be on schedule to tune in. A task marked complete in the home care system will help family members see that their elderly loved ones with a political interest are being given a hand in staying informed.

Additionally, homecare software, or a homecare system such as ClearCare can be used to help caregivers track upcoming political events that particular clients want to be involved with. For instance, seniors may want to attend a local debate – a task for that day can be set within a homecare system, like ClearCare. And most importantly, election day can be an important task for caregivers to assist seniors with transportation to, and homecare software is an innovative way to help caregivers remember these important events for their clients.

Becoming older doesn’t mean that Americans have become less politically active. With an interest in politics and the help of caregivers armed with a homecare software or homecare system, such as ClearCare, keeping up with the election can be a breeze.

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Derek Jones

Derek enjoys spending time with family running road races, has completed 6-half marathons, mountain biking, and anything to do with baseball or the outdoors.

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